The Golden Temple

I visited Amritsar last year with some friends. I have written about our visit to the Museum of Partition and Jalianwala Baug in this earlier post https://thatwhichiam.wordpress.com/2017/08/16/the-museum-of-partition/

Here I am just going to post some photos from the visit to the Golden Temple. It has had its troubles in the 1980s and I lived in Delhi as a child during the Operation Bluestar and the subsequent riots in Delhi followed by the assassination of the then PM Indira Gandhi.

Now, the temple is a beautiful place, quiet and clean. We were lucky to have a cloudy day with some smattering of rain giving us this incandescent light in which I manage to capture some spectacular photos all on my phone camera. We visited in the morning for the langar and again in the evening for the prayers.

arch with a view

blue lake

clouds and temple

stunning cloudsother dome

I was very intrigued to learn that Sant Namdeo, one of the saint -poets of Maharashtra is highly revered by the Sikhs and 62 of his hymns are part of their prayers ! He was born in 1270 and travelled around India along with Jnanadev and eventually ended up in Punjab, where he lived for 20 years.

” The thundering resonance of the Word has liberated me while living”

shabad

As always, though fully appreciative of the beauty and purpose of such places of worship, as a space for refuge from the crazy troubled world, as a safe haven, I return even more mystified by those of faith who can actually pray–basically at all and especially in such crowded spaces, no mater how clean and relatively quiet !

 

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2 thoughts on “The Golden Temple

  1. Lovely shots indeed!
    Sorry, but didn’t get the reference to the context re the line:
    The thundering resonance of the Word has liberated me while living”
    Could you please explain?

  2. Nice photos which captured the brightness along with the serenity…
    Your reference to Namdev reiterates the fact of the idea of a nation being there for millenia with saints like Namdev, Nanakdev, Meerabai so also the common people undertaking arduous pilgrimages from the Himalayas to Kanyakumari…
    As you have rightly said temples and places of worship provide a haven which acknowledges the beauty and omnipresence of the unknown.
    Inspite of the crowds and the noise it is a place where you are in a crowd which acknowledges your need for a “presence” which needs no words, nor things but a bowing down and an unshed tear and a trust that our unsaid prayers too will reach that all embraceing non- judgemental presence….

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